Weight Control: Better to Eat a Big Breakfast than Big Dinner

The importance of the time of day and our internal clock for food intake and energy metabolism is a very exciting research field. Future studies should investigate why we spend so much more energy after breakfast than after dinner

WeightControl.com Interview with:
M. Sc. Juliane Richter
University of Lübeck
Center of Brain, Behavior and Metabolism
Section of Psychoneurobiology

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: The background for this study is that there is still the misbelief that it does not matter when we eat and that the only thing that counts is the energy balance of the whole day. However, since our body has an internal clock and many processes in the body, for example glucose metabolism, are subject to diurnal variations, we investigated whether diet-induced thermogenesis also varies during the course of the day.

Diet-induced thermogenesis is the energy our body spends for the digestion, absorption and transport of nutrients. We found that diet-induced thermogenesis after breakfast is more than twice as high as after dinner. We also investigated whether this difference in time of day depends on the amount of calories consumed. In both cases, high- and low-calorie meals, the body spends more energy after breakfast than after dinner.

breakfast-timing of meals for weight control
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Obesity Prevented and Reversed in Mice By Blocking Cellular Receptor

We are beginning to understand how the blockage of the AHR prevents and reverses obesity, which may lead to a therapeutic treatment of obesity in humans.

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Craig R. Tomlinson, Ph.D.
Director of Genomics & Molecular Biology Shared Resource
Norris Cotton Cancer Center
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center
Lebanon, NH 03756

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?

Response: Obesity, a global epidemic, is a known contributor to numerous diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Preventing and reversing the obesity epidemic would be a critical aid in preventing and treating these diseases.

Our laboratory had discovered that a drug called NF, which was known to block the activity of a cellular receptor called the AHR, prevented obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet. We undertook studies to determine how the AHR, when inhibited by NF, exerted its effects on obesity.

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Is There a Link Between Obesity and Periodontal Disease?

Clinicians should educate patients about the importance of weight control affecting oral/periodontal health.

WeightControl.com Interview with:

Andres Pinto DMD, MPH, MSCE, MBA, FDS RCSEd, FICD 
Professor and Chair
Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences
Director, Oral Medicine Internship and MSD Program

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies
Case Western Reserve University and
Cleveland Clinic
Health Education Campus
School of Dental Medicine
Cleveland, OH

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: There is  strong association between oral health and systemic health.  Periodontal disease affects almost half of Americans and is characterized by increased inflammation. The focus of our review was to evaluate the association between obesity and periodontal disease, which has been reported earlier, with attention to the effects on the non-surgical management of periodontal disease. Our results indicate both disorders share similar inflammatory characteristics and may be associated.

However, multiple factors mediate this relationship, of course including oral hygiene. We were unable to find conclusive evidence on the impact of obesity on treatment planning for periodontal therapy, although the presumptive common pathophysiology provides an opportunity for active patient education.

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Using Diet Pills For Weight Control Linked to Increased Risk of Eating Disorder in Young Women

Over-the-counter diet pill and laxative use are not a healthy way to manage weight and young women, or consumers of any age or gender, should not use them for weight control

WeightControl.com Interview with:

Jordan A. Levinson BA
Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine
Boston Children’s Hospital
Boston, MA

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?

Response: Many unhealthy weight control behaviors, including the use of diet pills and laxatives for weight control, can put individuals at risk for developing eating disorders. Though the use of these products is common, it is incredibly dangerous and not recommended by health care providers for weight control. 

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BELVIQ® : FDA Accepts Eisai’s Supplemental New Drug Application to Update the Labeling For Anti-Obesity Agent

WeightControl.com Interview with:

Dr. Lynn Kramer, MD FAAN

Dr. Lynn Kramer

Dr. Lynn Kramer, MD FAAN
VP and Chief Clinical Officer & Chief Medical Office
Eisai Co., Ltd

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this announcement? 

Response: On February 25th, Eisai announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accepted its supplemental New Drug Application to potentially update the label for BELVIQ® (lorcaserin HCI) CIV 10 mg twice-daily/BELVIQ XR (lorcaserin HCI) CIV once daily  to include long-term efficacy and safety data from CAMELLIA-TIMI 61, a clinical trial of BELVIQ in 12,000 overweight and obese patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease and/or multiple CV risk factors such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

CAMELLIA-TIMI 61 is the first completed large-scale cardiovascular outcomes clinical trial for a weight loss agent. As reported and published in the New England Journal of Medicine on August 26th, the results showed that CAMELLIA-TIMI 61 met its primary safety objective, finding that long-term treatment with BELVIQ did not increase incidence of MACE in overweight and obese patients at high risk for a CV event (HR 0.99; 95% CI: 0.85 to 1.14; p<0.001). Since the study met the primary safety endpoint for non-inferiority for MACE, the study continued to assess for the primary efficacy endpoint assessing whether or not BELVIQ reduced the incidence of major CV events compared to placebo for a broader composite endpoint, MACE+ (consisting of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, hospitalization due to unstable angina, heart failure or coronary revascularization). Although superiority to placebo was not met, BELVIQ was non-inferior to placebo on the MACE+ composite, with similar event rates for BELVIQ and placebo. 

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Red Raspberries May Help Control Blood Sugar in Prediabetes

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Britt BurtonFreeman, Ph.D
Director of the Center for Nutrition Research at IFSH
Associate Professor, Food Science and Nutrition
Illinois Institute of Technology

"Raspberries" by theslowlane is licensed under CC BY 2.0. To view a copy of this license, visit: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0
“Raspberries” by theslowlane

WeightControl.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Red raspberries contain appreciable amounts of dietary fiber and a variety of other nutrients, such as vitamin C, vitamin K, magnesium and potassium. They also contain phytochemicals, such as polyphenols with documented biological activity suggesting metabolic benefits. However, there is limited data assessing the potential effects of red raspberries in humans, particularly in those people who might benefit the most, ie., people at risk for diabetes mellitus.

We investigated the health benefits of consuming 1-2 cups of red raspberries in a group of people who were overweight/obesity and had prediabetes and insulin resistance.

The results showed that when a breakfast meal was consumed with raspberries, less insulin was needed to manage blood sugar compared with a meal with no raspberries. Moreover, when two cups of red raspberries were included in the breakfast meal, blood sugar concentrations were significantly lower compared to consuming breakfast without raspberries.

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Same Health Benefits with Fast or Slow Weight Loss

WeightControl.com Interview with:

Jennifer L. Kuk, PhD
Associate Professor
York University
School of Kinesiology and Health Science
Sherman Health Science Research Centre, Rm 2002
Toronto, Ontario 

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: Traditionally, weight loss is prescribed at the rate of 1 to 2 pounds per week.  However, this is largely based on the observation that weight losses faster than 2 pounds per week put patients at an increased risk for gallstones.  It is unclear whether this is the optimal rate of weight loss for CVD or diabetes outcomes. Furthermore, fast weight loss has historically thought to be associated with poorer long term weight loss.  However, this was largely based on research using liquid diets.  Recent evidence suggests that faster weight loss may be similar to slower weight loss when more sensible lifestyle interventions are used.  Thus, if there are additional benefits of faster weight loss for CVD or diabetes outcomes, then there may a rationale for prescribing faster weight loss as the overall rate of gallstones is fairly low.

We observed that those who lose weight faster than 2lb/wk tend to lose more weight overall, but for the same overall weight loss, there is no difference in terms of health benefits with fast or slow weight loss.

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Are Men’s Magazines A Good Source of Information For Weight Control Advice?



A study in BMC Public Health finds that although men’s magazine refer to scientific information, “the content, format and scientific basis of dietary content of MH leaves much to be desired. The dietary advice as provided may not be conducive to public health”.

BMC Public Health. 2014 Oct 11;14:1062. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1062.
Dietary advice for muscularity, leanness and weight control in Men’s Health magazine: a content analysis.

Cook TM, Russell JM, Barker ME1.

Hospitals Need To Become Better Equipped To Deal With Obese Patients



The obesity epidemic is straining resources at health care facilities, as hospitals learn to adapt to heavier patients and the special resources needed to care for them.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/health-hospital-obesity-bariatric-michaelgarronhospital-uofalberta-1.4305767