You Weigh Most on Sunday Night, Least on Friday Morning

Dr. Brian Wansink Charles S. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University 15 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14850 WeightControl.com Interview with:
Dr. Brian Wansink
Charles S. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University
15 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14850


WeightControl.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Wansink:

·         Everybody’s weight follows a predictable weekly rhythm –  you gain a little bit over the weekend and lose a little bit over the week.

·         You weigh the most on Sunday night and the least on Friday morning.

·         The weekdays are when you lose weight.

·         The bigger the gap between your Sunday night weight and your Friday morning weight, the more likely you are to lose weight over the next year.

·         Weight losers lose their weight during the weekdays.
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Medical Students and Obesity Bias

Sean M. Phelan, Ph.D. M.P.H. Assistant Professor, Health Services Research Research Lab on Equity and Quality in Patient-Provider Encounters (EQUIPPE) and Office of Health Disparities Research Division of Health Care Policy and Research Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN 55905WeightControl.com Interview with:
Sean M. Phelan, Ph.D. M.P.H.
Assistant Professor, Health Services Research
Research Lab on Equity and Quality in Patient-Provider Encounters (EQUIPPE) and
Office of Health Disparities Research
Division of Health Care Policy and Research
Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN 55905
WeightControl.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Phelan: There were two important sets of findings in this study.

The first is that 1st year medical students have strong implicit and explicit biases against obese people.  Implicit bias, which is automatic and unconscious, was similar to reported levels of implicit racial bias and bias toward other stigmatized groups.  Explicit bias, however, was much worse than bias against other groups.  In one measure of positive feelings toward members of various groups, obese people were rated far lower than members of any race group, gays, lesbians, and poor people. This is potentially important because explicit attitudes tend to predict decision-making and verbal communication.

The other primary finding is that explicit and implicit weight bias was associated with several medical student characteristics.  Black students and women were significantly less biased overall; students born outside the US had less implicit bias, and students intending to focus on a primary care specialty had less explicit bias.
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Lower BMI Associated with Eating at Table, rather than with TV

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Sandra Cuellar-Healey
Deputy Director, MPS ABEIC
Director of Communications & Outreach
Food & Brand Lab
Director eXtension CoP Healthy Food Choices in Schools

WeightControl.com: What are the highlights of your study?

Answer: The higher the BMI of parents, the more frequent they reported eating with the TV on. Eating at the table in the dining room or kitchen is linked to lower BMIs for both children and parents. Boys who had a more social dinner experience tend to have lower BMI, especially in families where everyone stays at the table until everyone finished eating.

This proved true in parents as well.

One surprising result of this research is that helping prepare the meal correlates with higher BMI in children, especially girls.

Clinicians and patients should note that creating a healthier dining environment could be as simple as eating with your family, turning off the television, and engaging in conversation!

Citation:

Dinner rituals that correlate with child and adult BMI

Wansink, B. and van Kleef, E. (2013), Dinner rituals that correlate with child and adult BMI. Obesity. doi: 10.1002/oby.20629

 

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Fat Intake in Women: Correlation with Adropin Levels

Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Ph.D, FAHA Assistant Professor, Columbia University Research Associate, New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital New York, NY 10025WeightControl.com Interview with:
Marie-Pierre St-Onge & Andrew Butler
Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Ph.D, FAHA
Assistant Professor, Columbia University
Research Associate, New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center
St. Luke’s/Roosevelt Hospital NY, NY 10025

WeightControl.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: The main findings were two-fold:

(1) sleep restriction per se did not affect levels of adropin, a hormone that is related to metabolic homeostasis and cardiovascular function;

(2) adropin concentrations were related to fat intakes, particularly saturated fat intakes, in women and this was observed in both sleep restriction and habitual sleep conditions.

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Negative Weight-Based Stereotypes and Attitudes to Onself

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Rebecca Pearl, M.S., M.Phil.
Department of Psychology
Yale University
New Haven, CT 06520

Weight bias internalization, depression, and self-Reported health among overweight binge eating disorder patients

WeightControl.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: In this study, we found that among overweight patients with binge eating disorder, greater internalization of weight-biased attitudes was associated with poorer ratings of global health functioning.  Weight bias internalization, also known as self-directed weight stigma, refers to applying negative weight-based stereotypes and attitudes to oneself.  This research demonstrated that weight bias internalization was associated with greater symptoms of depression, which in turn was associated with poorer mental and physical health outcomes.  Thus, this study suggests that weight bias internalization is associated with worse health functioning, and this relationship may be mediated by symptoms of depression.

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BMI: Total Annual HealthCare Cost in UK

WeightControl.com Interview with:

William W. Tigbe, MD,MSc(MedSci),Cert,PhD,MPH
NIHR Clinical Lecturer in Public Health
Room B-146, Warwick Medical School
The University of Warwick
Gibbet Hill Campus Coventry CV4 7AL

WeightControl.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: Our data indicated that a unit difference in BMI of a UK adult relates to a £16 difference in annual healthcare cost. This was the case for both men and women across the BMI range 20-40kg/m2.

All categories of healthcare cost (i.e. prescription drugs, hospitalisation, primary care and outpatient care) were significantly higher for those with BMI above 40kg/m2 compared to BMI below 20kg/m2.

Annual healthcare cost increased linearly and more than doubles at BMI 40kg/m2 compared to 20kg/m2.

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Early Life Fat Restriction Associated with Later Life Leptin Resistance, High Body Weight

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Dr. MF Rolland-Cachera
Nutritional Epidemiology Research Unit (UREN), INSERM U557, INRA U1125, CNAM
University of Paris 13, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France.

Association of nutrition in early life with body fat and serum leptin at adult age

WeightControl.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Answer: Based on a two-decade-long prospective study, we found an association between low fat intake in early life and later high body weight and leptin concentration, suggesting that leptin resistance was programmed by early fat restrictions.

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