Time-Restricted Eating Studied for Weight Control and Health Benefits

If anyone is interested in tracking their own eating pattern and setting personal goals for when they eat, they are welcome to use the smartphone app that Dr. Panda’s lab created called myCircadianClock.

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Satchidananda Panda PhD
Professor, Regulatory Biology Laboratory
Salk Institute for Biological Studies
La Jolla, CA

Dr. Panda

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: Our bodies have internal rhythms to help keep everything happening in the body at the right place and the right time. These internal rhythms play a large role in our health and can increase the risk for disease when compromised. Time-restricted eating (TRE) maintains a consistent eating time to help support these circadian rhythms and overall health. 


WeightControl.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response:  Limiting food and beverages to a consistent 8-10 hours is an important part of a healthy lifestyle and can help prevent and treat chronic disease. Many studies have shown moderate weight loss (3-5%) as well as other health benefits including improved glucose regulation, decreased blood pressure, and decreased cholesterol. 

WeightControl.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: This review highlights the need for larger and longer term Time-restricted eating trials in diverse groups including those who are healthy as well as individuals with chronic diseases. It is also important that all TRE trials assess the timing of eating before and throughout the study to understand how eating patterns change and adherence to the intervention.

WeightControl.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: If anyone is interested in tracking their own eating pattern and setting personal goals for when they eat, they are welcome to use the smartphone app that Dr. Panda’s lab created called myCircadianClock. The app is available on iPhone and android phones, is free to use, and data is only used for research purposes. You can sign up at www.mycircadianclock.org.

Disclosures: Dr. Satchin Panda is the author of The Circadian Code.​

Citation:

Emily N Manoogian, Lisa S Chow, Pam R Taub, Blandine Laferrère, Satchidananda Panda, Time-restricted eating for the prevention and management of metabolic diseases, Endocrine Reviews, 2021;, bnab027, https://doi.org/10.1210/endrev/bnab027

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Weight Control: Better to Eat a Big Breakfast than Big Dinner

The importance of the time of day and our internal clock for food intake and energy metabolism is a very exciting research field. Future studies should investigate why we spend so much more energy after breakfast than after dinner

WeightControl.com Interview with:
M. Sc. Juliane Richter
University of Lübeck
Center of Brain, Behavior and Metabolism
Section of Psychoneurobiology

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: The background for this study is that there is still the misbelief that it does not matter when we eat and that the only thing that counts is the energy balance of the whole day. However, since our body has an internal clock and many processes in the body, for example glucose metabolism, are subject to diurnal variations, we investigated whether diet-induced thermogenesis also varies during the course of the day.

Diet-induced thermogenesis is the energy our body spends for the digestion, absorption and transport of nutrients. We found that diet-induced thermogenesis after breakfast is more than twice as high as after dinner. We also investigated whether this difference in time of day depends on the amount of calories consumed. In both cases, high- and low-calorie meals, the body spends more energy after breakfast than after dinner.

breakfast-timing of meals for weight control
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