Weight Control: Better to Eat a Big Breakfast than Big Dinner

The importance of the time of day and our internal clock for food intake and energy metabolism is a very exciting research field. Future studies should investigate why we spend so much more energy after breakfast than after dinner

WeightControl.com Interview with:
M. Sc. Juliane Richter
University of Lübeck
Center of Brain, Behavior and Metabolism
Section of Psychoneurobiology

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: The background for this study is that there is still the misbelief that it does not matter when we eat and that the only thing that counts is the energy balance of the whole day. However, since our body has an internal clock and many processes in the body, for example glucose metabolism, are subject to diurnal variations, we investigated whether diet-induced thermogenesis also varies during the course of the day.

Diet-induced thermogenesis is the energy our body spends for the digestion, absorption and transport of nutrients. We found that diet-induced thermogenesis after breakfast is more than twice as high as after dinner. We also investigated whether this difference in time of day depends on the amount of calories consumed. In both cases, high- and low-calorie meals, the body spends more energy after breakfast than after dinner.

breakfast-timing of meals for weight control
Continue reading “Weight Control: Better to Eat a Big Breakfast than Big Dinner”

Obesity Prevented and Reversed in Mice By Blocking Cellular Receptor

We are beginning to understand how the blockage of the AHR prevents and reverses obesity, which may lead to a therapeutic treatment of obesity in humans.

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Craig R. Tomlinson, Ph.D.
Director of Genomics & Molecular Biology Shared Resource
Norris Cotton Cancer Center
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center
Lebanon, NH 03756

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?

Response: Obesity, a global epidemic, is a known contributor to numerous diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Preventing and reversing the obesity epidemic would be a critical aid in preventing and treating these diseases.

Our laboratory had discovered that a drug called NF, which was known to block the activity of a cellular receptor called the AHR, prevented obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet. We undertook studies to determine how the AHR, when inhibited by NF, exerted its effects on obesity.

Continue reading “Obesity Prevented and Reversed in Mice By Blocking Cellular Receptor”

Is There a Link Between Obesity and Periodontal Disease?

Clinicians should educate patients about the importance of weight control affecting oral/periodontal health.

WeightControl.com Interview with:

Andres Pinto DMD, MPH, MSCE, MBA, FDS RCSEd, FICD 
Professor and Chair
Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences
Director, Oral Medicine Internship and MSD Program

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center
Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies
Case Western Reserve University and
Cleveland Clinic
Health Education Campus
School of Dental Medicine
Cleveland, OH

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: There is  strong association between oral health and systemic health.  Periodontal disease affects almost half of Americans and is characterized by increased inflammation. The focus of our review was to evaluate the association between obesity and periodontal disease, which has been reported earlier, with attention to the effects on the non-surgical management of periodontal disease. Our results indicate both disorders share similar inflammatory characteristics and may be associated.

However, multiple factors mediate this relationship, of course including oral hygiene. We were unable to find conclusive evidence on the impact of obesity on treatment planning for periodontal therapy, although the presumptive common pathophysiology provides an opportunity for active patient education.

Continue reading “Is There a Link Between Obesity and Periodontal Disease?”