New Weight Loss Model Targets Individual Response to Food Cues

Individuals who are high on food cue responsiveness typically have uncontrolled eating and ruminate (think) about food a lot of the time

WeightControl.com Interview with:

Dr. Kerri N. Boutelle, Ph.D
Department of Pediatrics
Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science,
Department of Psychiatry
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: Behavioral weight loss, which includes nutrition and physical activity education and behavior therapy techniques (also called a lifestyle intervention), is not effective for all adults with overweight and obesity and of those who lose weight, the majority regain the weight back.  This suggests that there are unaddressed underlying mechanisms that impact the effectiveness of these interventions. 

We developed a novel weight loss model based on appetitive traits, called regulation of cues (roc), that targets improving responsiveness to hunger and satiety cues and decreasing responsiveness to food cues.  This is different than behavioral weight loss as it targets these internal control mechanisms while behavioral weight loss targets external control mechanisms.

After Bariatric Surgery, Women Advised to Wait At Least Two Years to Conceive

After bariatric surgery there is a rapid weight loss that may impair an adequate weight gain during pregnancy and may also be associated with nutritional deficiencies

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Dr Ana Carreira and Dr Bárbara Araújo
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra
Coimbra, Portuga

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study? 

Response: Bariatric surgery is increasingly common in women of reproductive age and reduces the risk of obesity-related comorbidities in pregnancy. However, women after bariatric surgery have an increased risk of having a baby who is underweight (small for gestational age, SGA). A shorter bariatric surgery-to-conception interval (BSCI) has been one of the factors associated with a higher risk of SGA neonates, and, as a result, women are generally advised to wait at least 12 months after bariatric surgery before trying to conceive. However, the optimal bariatric surgery-to-conception interval is yet to be determined, and current recommendation differ among scientific societies, with some advocating a minimum of 12months and others 18 or 24 months.

Weill Cornell Medicine Pioneers in Weight Control and Intellihealth Launch ‘Weight Matters’ Podcast

In the Weight Matters podcast, Dr. Katherine Saunders and Dr. Louis Aronne address the many misconceptions associated with weight and how it impacts our broader health.

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Louis Aronne, MD
Co-Founder and Chief Medical Advisor at Intellihealth
The Sanford I. Weill Professor of Metabolic Research
Weill Cornell Medicine Medical Director
Comprehensive Weight Control Center

Dr. Aronne

WeightControl.com:  How does obesity affect health and health care costs?

Response:  Obesity is a leading contributor to over 200 diseases: type 2 diabetes, heart disease, many types of cancer, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. All of these diseases and comorbidities have a link to excess weight, and their severity could be reduced by addressing the underlying issue of obesity. According to the World Health Organization, almost 3 million people die as a result of obesity or excess weight each year. And the National Institutes of Health has reported that obesity and overweight are now the second leading cause of death nationally. Perhaps that’s because unlike the more than 80 percent of patients with diabetes who receive treatment for their disease, less than 2 percent of patients with obesity or overweight are treated according to the latest guidelines.

Obesity is also an economic burden, leading to more than $210 billion a year in direct medical costs. Indirect costs, such as employer expenses, absenteeism, and lost productivity add up to as much as $500 billion annually. For adults with obesity, that translates to more than $3,500 in medical care costs per patient each year.

NEJM: Time-Restricted Eating in Weight Loss

Time-restricted eating combined with calorie restriction offer a viable and sustainable approach for person who wants to lose weight.

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Huijie Zhang   M.D. & Ph.D
Professor and Chief Physician
Deputy Director of Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Nafang Hospital of Southern Medical University
Guangzhou, China

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: Time-restricted eating is one of the most popular intermittent fasting regimens involving a specific eating period within a 24-hour cycle. Time-restricted eating regimen has gained attention because it reduces weight and enhances adherence. The long-term efficacy and safety of time-restricted eating for weight loss are not clear.

In this randomized clinical trial, among patients with obesity, a regimen of time-restricted eating was not more beneficial with regard to reduction in body weight, body fat, or metabolic risk factors than daily calorie restriction.

Study Evaluates Impact of Food Choices on Life Expectancy

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Lars T. Fadnes
Professor & research group leader
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care
& Bergen Addiction Research
Department of Addiction Medicine
University of Bergen & Haukeland University Hospital

Prof. Fadnes

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study? 

Response: Food is fundamental for health, and globally dietary risk factors are estimated to cause 11 million deaths and 255 million disability-adjusted life years annually. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors study provides summary measures of population health that are relevant when comparing health systems but does not estimate the impact of alterations in food group composition and respective health benefits. The EAT–Lancet commission did present a planetary diet, but it gives limited information on the health impact of other diets, and few people are able to adhere to strict health  maximization approaches. 

Continue reading “Study Evaluates Impact of Food Choices on Life Expectancy”

Getting Enough Sleep Can Be a Game Changer for Weight Loss

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Esra Tasali, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine
Director, Sleep Research Center
Department of Medicine
The University of Chicago
Chicago, IL 60637

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: We knew from prior research that sleep deprivation can stimulate appetite and cravings for junk food, and increases weight gain. What we did not know is whether we can do something about it in real-life?

Our randomized controlled trial on sleep extension in real-life setting  found that getting sufficient sleep reduces caloric intake by on average 270kcal per day.

Restaurants Add Lower Calorie Options After Calorie Display Laws, But Keep Old Favorites on Menus

Our research suggests that restaurants are bringing lower-calorie options to their menus now that they are required to display calorie labels on their menus.

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Anna HGrummon PhD , Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Nutrition
Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health

Anna-H.-Grummon
Dr. Grummon

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: As of 2018, large chain restaurants in the US are required by law to display calorie information on their menus. A number of researchers have looked at how consumers respond to the new calorie labels. What was not yet known was how the industry responded to the calorie labeling law. Our study is the first to investigate whether nationwide rollout of the calorie labeling law spurred restaurants to change the types of foods they offer. We found that the rollout of the calorie labels appeared to prompt restaurants to introduce lower-calorie items to their menus, but did not spur changes to existing menu items.


WeightControl.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Our research suggests that restaurants are bringing lower-calorie options to their menus now that they are required to display calorie labels on their menus. These new options could help Americans find foods that meet their health goals when they get take-out or dine at restaurants. 

At the same time, existing menu items did not change after the labels were rolled out. This suggests that additional policy changes might be needed to nudge restaurants to make these existing items healthier. The calorie labeling law is important in providing consumers with information about menu items that was hard to find previously. Future policies can build on this success.

WeightControl.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Our study examined restaurant menus, not what consumers buy or eat. So we don’t yet know how these changes to menus will affect what consumers eat and drink at restaurants, or ultimately how this policy will affect health outcomes. Future studies can examine how consumers respond to both calorie labels and to changes in the types of items sold by restaurants.

WeightControl.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: Mandatory labelling may have spurred restaurants to introduce new, lower calorie items to their menus. These calorie labels also allow consumers to easily view the calorie count of their meal, information which was difficult to find before the law.

No disclosures.

Citation:

Grummon AH, Petimar J, Soto MJ, et al. Changes in Calorie Content of Menu Items at Large Chain Restaurants After Implementation of Calorie Labels. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(12):e2141353. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.41353

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Freshman Fifteen: Lifestyle Changes Can Help Prevent Weight Gain

We found that first-year college students’ BMI increased, with an average weight gain being a little over three pounds across the first semester.

WeightControl.com Interview with:

Yangyang Deng
Ph.D. Student | Sport Pedagogy
Graduate Teaching Assistant
Children’s Physical Activity, Fitness lab
University of Georgia

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?

Response: The idea for this study was to test whether freshman 15 is really a myth or is there some truth to it. Maybe more importantly, we wanted to test what are the main factors that may impact unwanted weight gain. Of course, we also wanted to help college students to improve their health. Previous research has shown that freshman students are especially vulnerable due to the transition to a new environment, and they are more likely to adopt negative health behaviors, e.g., sedentary habits and unhealthy diet. Previous data has shown that less than 50% of college students engage in the recommended minimum of 150 weekly minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). Moreover, first-year college students’ dietary behaviors are getting unhealthier, students are eating excessive amounts of trans fats/fast food and not consuming the recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables, and consuming too much sugar-sweetened beverages.

Continue reading “Freshman Fifteen: Lifestyle Changes Can Help Prevent Weight Gain”

Retail Outlets Promote Impulse Buys of Sugary Items in Check-Out Aisles

Placement of these items may drive impulse buys, and because these stores sold products for children, parents and caregivers should be aware of these practices at the outset.

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Corey Hannah Basch, Ed.D., M.P.H., CHES
Professor and Department Chair Public Health
William Paterson University

Dr-Corey-Basch
Dr. Basch

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: There are many factors that influence food choices, which are not limited simply to access and availability. This study focused on exposure to opportunities for unplanned food and beverage purchases, specifically candy, snack foods, and sugary beverages are available in checkout lines in a convenience sample retail chain stores in New York City that sell products for children.

The main findings are that most of the stores in the sample sold at least one form of convenience foods at the checkout. In addition, “corral-style” checkout lines had a more diverse sample of snack foods available throughout the line.  

Continue reading “Retail Outlets Promote Impulse Buys of Sugary Items in Check-Out Aisles”

Personalized Coupons, Recipes and Education Helped Shoppers Make Healthier Food Purchases

we are interested in scaling this work so it can reach more US adults and help them improve their diet quality and diet-related health.

WeightControl.com Interview with:
Maya Vadiveloo, PhD, RD
Assistant Professor
Nutrition and Food Sciences
University of Rhode Island

Dr.  Vadiveloo

WeightControl.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings?

Response: We conducted this study with the goal of helping people make healthier dietary choices while at the grocery store. We know that food companies use personalized messages and discounts that prompt people to buy unhealthy foods. We tested whether similar approaches could be used to encourage people to buy healthier foods by sending people 2 personalized, healthy food coupons each week to make these foods more affordable. We also wanted our recommendations to reflect people’s dietary preferences, so we only sent people coupons that aligned with preferences they told us at the beginning of the study .

The coupons were directly linked to people’s loyalty cards and they also received a brief nutrition message and recipe via email every week.

Overall, we found that people liked the personalized healthy food incentives, that it prompted them to purchase more healthy foods, and improved the overall diet quality of their grocery purchases.

Continue reading “Personalized Coupons, Recipes and Education Helped Shoppers Make Healthier Food Purchases”